Tag Archives: Embroidery

Sweet Bag at the Met

Last month several of us visited the Ratti Textile Center at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. They were very friendly and accommodating of our visit. Anyone can get an appointment to view textiles, but the items must be in their department – no costumes/clothing unfortunately and the items can not be on view in the Museum. We were allowed to take as many pictures as we wanted as well. Appointments were limited to 2 hours.

We were allowed 10 items and viewed both embroidery and lace items from the 16th and early 17th centuries. It was amazing to see these items in person. They were all laid out on a table with bright lights for easy viewing. We are not allowed to touch anything, but Isobel, our docent, was happy to flip the items over so we could see both sides.

I will gradually post about the items we saw and share my observations. I cannot share my images online but am happy to show them to anyone that is interested at a work weekend or event or if you want to come by for a visit. The images I have posted here are from the Met website. Unfortunately for the first item all they have is B&W, one of the reasons I choose this bag to see in person.

Bag, first half 17th century British, Silk and metal thread; L. 4 5/8 x W. 4 5/8 inches (11.7 x 11.7 cm) The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Rogers Fund, by exchange, 1929 (29.23.21) http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/222248

Bag, first half 17th century
British,
Silk and metal thread; L. 4 5/8 x W. 4 5/8 inches (11.7 x 11.7 cm)
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Rogers Fund, by exchange, 1929 (29.23.21)
http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/222248

The first item we saw was 29.23.21 a sweet bag. I was overwhelmed by how exquisitely delicate it is. Embroidered on white silk satin, the threads are incredibly delicate and fine; every stitch detailed.

The main motifs were different on each side of the bag. Something I haven’t seen before. The side not shown has a lovely pink/white tudor rose in middle, a blue borage in the upper right, a yellow and white pansy in the upper left, some blue leaf like thing in the lower left and a honeysuckle flower in the lower right corner.

The silk threads are a variety of soft whites, pinks, yellows, blues and more bold greens and blues used in a satin stitch for the motifs.  I am sure there is some fading with age, but I thought the piece in remarkably good condition. The motif on the lower left shown above has an underlying satin stitch fading from dark blue to light blue to white with gold silk threads couched on top to create a grid pattern. Then inside each grid is a tiny french knot.

The pailletes are incredibly tiny, about 2mm in diameter. Each one is secured with a tiny piece of purl. The coiling stems are pieces of couched purl (looks like rough purl – round gilt as opposed to flattened gilt) out-lined with a 3-ply twisted gold thread that is also couched down with a gold silk. The metal threads are a combination of tarnished silver and gold.

I briefly viewed the interior of the bag. The interior pink silk lining is quite pale and deteriorating. The purse string is the Green Dorge pattern I did for my sweet bag, 4 pink silk threads bordering two gold threads in the middle. Seems to be a popular pattern. It was easy to weave.

There are no tassels anywhere. The bead is woven similar to that described in Jacqui Carey’s book on Sweet Bags and that I used to make mine. There are turks head knots as well. The sides just look like they are sewn together and then lined with the 3 ply twisted gilt thread.

I enjoyed viewing this item in person, it was an incredible experience to see it, experience it and take the time to really look at it. Pictures just don’t do it justice.

Ruby Joust and Other Divers News

On Saturday the 24th of May, members of Gardner’s Company turned out at the SCA’s Ruby Joust to fence, frolic, share stuff we’ve made, and lure unsuspecting volunteers into the manly art of pike drill.

Zeke explains what's what.

Zeke explains what’s what.

Files fall in for instruction.

Files fall in for instruction.

Did he say "port" or "shoulder"?

Did he say “port” or “shoulder”?

Ah, right, that's better!

Ah, right, that’s better!

Marching off to the privies.

Marching off to the privies.

Ah, nothing like a pleasant afternoon marching about!

Ah, nothing like a pleasant afternoon marching about!

Saluting the assembled mob...eh...populace.

Saluting the assembled mob…eh…populace.

Perhaps the most important pike maneuver: Assume a Lazy Posture.

Perhaps the most important pike maneuver: Assume a Lazy Posture.

A few weeks back, some our members attended Jamestown Day as costumed interpreters. Jane Gravesend was kind enough to grab a few pics of the Governor’s chair in its new home.
image
image
For those of you who do Facebook, Ester Pickering has completed an amazing embroidered sweet bag, which was also on display at Ruby Joust.

Jamestown Shirt Done!

So Wednesday after 3 months of hand-sewing and embroidery, one of the Jamestown shirts is done!

Dye_130608_0009

Each piece was hemmed by hand with white linen hiding each raw edge. The pieces were then assembled using open work seams. This seam consists of a blanket stitch on the edge of each piece, buttonhole stitch just wider. Then the pieces are joined by stitching around the black silk on the blanket stitch with a white silk to join the pieces and create a decorative spiral look. This was based on examples from Janet Arnold’s Patterns of Fashion 4.

Dye_130608_0016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The neck was reinforced with a spider type stitched, based on examples from Janet Arnold.

Dye_130608_0019

The embroidery was stitched with a simple back-stitch and a reverse chain for the stems. A french knot was used for flower centers.

Dye_130608_0013

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dye_130608_0015

Finally the ties were finger woven using 5 loops into a square cord using white silk.

Dye_130608_0022

 

 

 

 

 

 

Materials used: Soie Perlee black silk and Gemstone white silk. The Au ver a Soie line is colorfast with washing while Gemstone silks will fade with time and washing in my experience. White linen thread and white linen fabric. I will post close up shots of the open work seams and embroidery later.

Dye_130608_0020